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20/08/19

Retweetd From Harris Federation

Here are some of our brilliant students heading to and this year. Many are the first in their family to attend university and all have beaten extraordinary odds to get there. We are so proud of them and wish them every happiness and success. https://t.co/HJt7DF572H

28/06/19

Retweetd From HarrisSchoolDirect

Meet Ashleigh, previously an English tutor and copy editor, now training to teach English at https://t.co/AEvS34sTxs https://t.co/yOqOW0pdDI

09/03/19

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Exam Invigilators and Scribes required .Apply now https://t.co/7hNmdoyqyR https://t.co/aqv3xdV44K

09/03/19

Retweetd From Transformation Trust

It was fantastic to start with completing the The winning team came up with a great idea https://t.co/KMpjYGbcFO

13/02/19

Retweetd From ElaineWilson

Well done! Tom Harriott EdD student and will also present his work

04/02/19

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Harris Academy Battersea are looking for an Achievement Director for Business and Economics. Apply now https://t.co/l2FcWH2de0 https://t.co/SKRdkbjiYv

28/01/19

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Our is Harris Academy Battersea! We're thrilled to get to work closely alongside this successful Academy to offer their facilities for community use and hire. To take a detailed look at what they can offer please visit.. https://t.co/wqcqQL5jI1 https://t.co/okzZ20NqKe

24/01/19

Retweetd From Parents and Teachers for Excellence

Great work from , whose overall P8 is a very impressive 0.49. in particular stands out with a stunning score of 1.26.

19/01/19

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Happy Friday . We have our 3rd visit locked down and it's at the famous ! It's your chance to learn from one of the most successful turnaround schools, now rated outstanding. https://t.co/17Tp8Rtoke

14/01/19

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Lovely to see our Scholars here for the second Regional Training Day . Thank you to and for hosting school visits. It is wonderful to see the Scholars really engage with the programme.

18/12/18

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Find out how pupils at are finding Latin, as over 400 students embark on the subject https://t.co/1XvX09D1Ms

14/12/18

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Congratulations for winning our U14 🏀 Girls Basketball yesterday. Good luck in Representing in London School Games final. https://t.co/prwNjA3dwN

04/12/18

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Students from and taking advantage of the CV surgery and job advice from the mentors 😁 https://t.co/sHp5gldEsQ

18/10/18

Retweetd From Parents and Teachers for Excellence

. once again had some brilliant results: , Harris St Johns Wood, and had great P8 scores of 0.34, 0.58, 0.89 and 1.27 respectively.

18/05/18

Well done to our Year 9 Boys' Football Team who have secured a place in the final of the Wandsworth League. The final is this Wednesday at Southfields and they'll be playing against Ernest Bevin. We wish them all the best of luck.

18/05/18

Students Secure Second Place at Wandsworth Athletics Championships - Latest News - Harris Academy Battersea https://t.co/3OHmfM1fwe

18/05/18

Did you know we now have a page to keep you up to date with all our Academy news? Search for Harris Academy Battersea and follow and share us.

23/06/17

Retweetd From Karl Hoods

Great to see inspiring future generations. Hope the students had fun! https://t.co/DWifo4WsCa

20/06/17

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Congratulations to students! Fun 3 days!! Thank you for coming https://t.co/IkGSt8kDmV

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English

English: Mastery Curriculum and Assessment

Overview:

Readers and writers change the world. As such, at Harris Academy Battersea we develop students into excellent readers and writers so that they can make valid contributions in the world. We expose students to some of the best texts ever written and teach them how to explore these texts in detail and read for meaning: considering narrative, writer construction and key messages to respective readerships. Additionally, by exposing students to great works we teach them how to replicate good writing, encouraging them to develop their own style and flair. Students study texts from the 16th century to present day, in order to give them a breadth of literature and to inspire them. A strong, rigorous curriculum helps us to develop readers and writers, but we also do this by encouraging students to master threshold concepts and skills systematically before progressing in their learning. Students focus on the minute skills that make up effective reading and writing, and over their time with Harris Academy Battersea, seek to become proficient and effective in them all.

Mastery:

Writing Mastery Strands

W1: I can manipulate the reader's response through my grammatical structures and sentence choices

Most of my sentences and punctuation are accurate when I write simple sentences. I sometimes I struggle to correctly demarcate sentences.

I can demonstrate a complete knowledge of basic forms of punctuation and mostly apply them accurately. I can demarcate sentences using capital letters and full stops.

I can demonstrate a complete knowledge and accurate use of a range of punctuation. I sometimes make errors where ambitious structures are attempted.

I can demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of punctuation. It is accurately and confidently used to develop overall meaning. There is variety in my sentence structure with only occasional errors in ambitious structures.

I can demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of punctuation, which I employ in sophisticated and subtle ways

I am able to employ varied and inventive use of structural features which I can use judiciously across the text.

W2: I can manipulate the reader's response through my structural choices (whole text)

I am able to create one or two unlinked ideas. I am unable to write in paragraphs. I show very limited or no evidence of structural features.

I am able to create some links between relevant ideas, although these are achieved simply. I sometimes start new paragraphs without good reason. I am able to employ simple structural features.

I am able to create an increasing variety of linked and relevant ideas. I make some use of paragraphs and some use of discourse markers. I make some use of structural features.

I am able to create coherent paragraphs with integrated discourse markers. I frequently make use of effective structural features.

I am able to fluently link paragraphs with seamlessly integrated discourse markers. I am able to create highly structured and developed writing, incorporating a range of integrated and complex idea.

W3: I can manipulate the reader's response through my vocabulary choices

I use simple, generally appropriate vocabulary but I don’t use many different words. I do use occasional words for effect.

My writing shows some evidence of deliberate vocabulary choices. I try to use new vocabulary to match my topic.

I choose my vocabulary to have an effect on my reader. I use a reasonably wide vocabulary although I don’t always choose the best word.

I choose vocabulary which is generally appropriate to my purpose and audience. I use a range of vocabulary which is generally varied and often ambitious, even though my choices may not always be apt.

My extensive vocabulary is often imaginative and consistently well-matched to my purpose and audience.

W4: I can manipulate the reader's response through my use of linguistic and literary devices

I am unable to apply linguistic or literary devices.

I can sometimes make use simple linguistic and literary devices, although these may lack imagination.

I can sometimes make use of linguistic and literary devices, sometimes employed with success.

I am able to create a range of appropriate linguistic and literary devices.

I demonstrate evidence of conscious crafting of linguistic and literary devices.

I can sustain the use of well-crafted and original linguistic and literary devices.

W5: I can communicate effectively and clearly. My tone, style and register match purpose, form and audience

I am unable to demonstrate an awareness of purpose, form or audience.

I am able to demonstrate a sense of purpose, form and/or audience, however this is sometimes inconsistent.

I am able to demonstrate some sustained attempt to match purpose, form and audience; I demonstrate some control of register.

I am able to ensure tone, style and register generally matched to purpose, form and audience.

I am able to ensure tone, style and register consistently match purpose, form and audience.

I am able to ensure tone, style and register are assuredly matched to purpose, form and audience. In doing so, my work demonstrates an ability to be manipulative, subtle and increasingly abstract.

W6: My spelling is secure

I can generally spell basic spelling accurately.

My spelling of straightforward vocabulary is secure. More complex words are often spelt incorrectly.

I demonstrate some accurate spelling of more complex words.

I generally demonstrate accurate spelling, including complex and irregular words.

I consistently demonstrate a high level of accuracy in spelling, including ambitious vocabulary.

Reading Mastery Strands

R1: I can appreciate explicit and implicit meanings and can summarise ideas and information. I can identify and interpret themes, perspectives and information.

I am unable to comment on writer’s viewpoint or summarise ideas in a text.

I am able to comment simply on ideas, and state what a text suggests to me.

I can summarise more simple texts successfully; I am able to read between the lines and present my thoughts as inferences.

I can infer, interpret and summarise a writer’s ideas; in my explanations, I consider texts thematically, sometimes with reference to wider literary contexts.

I can create impressive interpretations of texts; I make perceptive links between subtle details and broader themes, within a wider literary context.

R2: I can appreciate the way a writer creates effects through choices in punctuation, choices in structure on a sentence and text level and choices in form.

I am not able to comment on structure or form.

I can show simple awareness of structure and form; I am able to offer general comments on possible effects of these features.

I can identify some features of structure and form; I can comment on the effect of these features, sometimes with success.

I can identify most features of structure and form; I can explain the effect of the writer’s choice of these with reference to how they shape meaning.

I can identify a full range of features of structure and form; I can analyse the effects of the writer’s choice of these features, linking them precisely to the overall effects being created.

R3: I can appreciate the way a writer creates effects through use of linguistic and literary devices, and vocabulary choices.

I am not able to make comments on language choices.

I can show a simple awareness of language choices; I can offer simple comments on the ideas that these language choices convey.

I can identify some linguistic and literary devices; I can comment on the effect of these, sometimes with success.

I can identify an increasing number of linguistic and literary devices; I can explain the effects of the writer’s choice of linguistic and literary devices.

I can trace patterns of language across a text; I can analyse linguistic and literary devices with assured insight.

R4: I can appreciate how a writer's tone, style and register are matched to purpose, form and audience.

I cannot recognise the tone and style of the text.

I can make simple comments on aspects of tone and formality; I can show an awareness of a writer’s purpose and form.

I can make supported comments on tone and features of style; I can identify a writer’s purpose and form.

I can explore a writer’s tone, register and style; I can comment upon purpose, form and audience.

I can evaluate how a writer establishes tone, register and style, tracing developments across a text; I am able to relate this to purpose, form and audience.

R5: I appreciate the way that historical, literary and social contexts influence text creation and reader interpretation.

I am no yet able to comment on how a context can influence a text.

I can comment upon how various of contexts, including contexts of production and reception, can affect texts; I can comment upon how context might influence a writer's themes, ideas and use of language, structure and form.

I can comment upon how various of contexts, including contexts of production and reception, can affect texts; I can comment upon how context might influence a writer's themes, ideas and use of language, structure and form.

I can explain how contexts, including contexts of production and reception, can affect texts in different ways; I can present an explanation of how context might influence a writer's themes, ideas and use of language, structure and form.

I have a clear overview of how a range of contexts, including contexts of production and reception, can affect texts in a range of ways; I can analyse and evaluate how context might influence a writer's themes, ideas and use of language, structure and form.

R6: I use terminology, Standard English and an appropriate critical voice in my responses.

I do not yet use subject terminology or Standard English; my spelling, punctuation and grammar is sufficiently poor to prevent understanding of meaning.

I am beginning to refer to subject terminology; I sometimes communicate my ideas in Standard English; my spelling, punctuation and grammar can sometimes hinder meaning; I cannot yet use an appropriate critical voice.

I can sometimes make use of subject terminology; I can usually communicate my ideas in Standard English, attempting a range of grammatical structures and punctuation, and my spelling of basic words is accurate; I am beginning to create a critical voice, though it is not always consistent.

I can make use of accurate subject terminology; I can communicate my ideas in Standard English, demonstrating control of grammatical structures and punctuation, and my spelling of more complex words is generally accurate; I can establish and maintain a clear critical voice and I communicate my ideas more formally.

I can make judicious use of subject terminology with confidence and precision; I can communicate my ideas in Standard English, with a high level of technical accuracy; I communicate my ideas formally and concisely, with a confident critical voice.

R7: I can compare texts critically.

I cannot yet make comparisons between different texts.

I can identify connections between texts; I can make comments in relation to similarities and differences in content.

I can comment on the similarities and differences between the ideas and viewpoints in texts; I comment on the different ways these ideas are presented.

I can form a detailed comparison of the viewpoints and ideas in different texts; I can explain the different ways these are presented.

I can form an evaluative comparison of the viewpoints and ideas in different texts; I can analyse the different ways in which they are presented.

R8: I can support my viewpoints with appropriate textual references.

I do not yet make reference to text.

I can use quotations to make reference to relevant details of a text.

I can use carefully selected quotations and more general reference, as appropriate, to support my comments on text.

I can use a range of integrated references, including embedded quotations, to effectively support my exploration of text.

I can make judicious use of precise reference to support interpretations of text.

Summary of Content

 

In year 7, students are introduced to the English mastery curriculum and focuses, incrementally, on the different aspects of mastery. Students’ learning is focused on the English Language Paper 1 (AQA) and English Literature Paper 1 (AQA). Students begin by being introduced to the context surrounding Victorian Literature and Dickens. Students then explore plot, characters, themes, symbols and authorial intention, whilst reading ‘A Christmas Carol’. Upon completion of the text, students consider plot and characterisation from a structural point of view. This then lends itself to students learning narrative writing, and how to structure a story-based writing task. The spring term begins with students being introduced to the context surrounding Shakespeare, Elizabethan/Jacobean England and drama, before the exploration of ‘Romeo and Juliet’. Students then read and explore plot, characters, themes, symbols and authorial intention. Focus is on reading for meaning and analysis. In the summer term, students explore some of the greatest Greek myths and legends, but do so in order to prompt descriptive writing. Images, statements and segments of stories are used to inspire student descriptive writing. Students are taught multiple methods to describe effectively to support them in this. In Summer 2, students shift their focus to considering how Greek myths and legends are structured from a plot perspective. Students are then introduced to the idea of evaluation, and have to make several evaluations based upon plot, characterisation and structuring of the stories. The year culminates in a KS3 English Language Paper 1 exam to review student skills across the year.

 

In year 8, students build upon the skills mastered in year 7, and focus on English Language Paper 2 (AQA) and English Literature Paper 2 (AQA). Students are introduced to poetry and explore poetry focused on war and conflict, ranging in their dates of publication but with a particular focus on WWI. Students are then introduced to comparison, and seek to develop comparative skills in order to compare two poems. For autumn 2, students extend their exploration of war and conflict by analysing non-fiction through the form of diaries, reviews, articles, essays, letters and speeches. Students practise writing according to these forms by unpicking good models. For the Spring term, students are reintroduced to the context surrounding Shakespeare, Elizabethan/Jacobean England and drama for their study of ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’. Students then read and explore plot, characters, themes and symbols. Focus is on reading for meaning and analysis. In the Summer term, students are introduced to a range of dark, sinister and gothic short stories (Edgar Allan Poe, H.G. Wells and Roald Dahl). Additionally, Mary Shelley and Susan Hill extracts are explored to introduce the style. Students then consider plot and themes, and compare short stories. For Summer 2, students extend their exploration of gothic literature by analysing non-fiction. Students explore the form of novel introductions, diaries, reviews, articles, essays, letters and speeches. Students are then assessed on a different writing form to the one assessed in Autumn 2. The year culminates in a KS3 English Language Paper 2 exam to review student skills across the year.

 

In year 9, students again build upon the skills mastered in year 7 and 8, and as such, explore each of the mastery strands. Year 9 focus on English Language Paper 1 (AQA), English Literature Paper 1 (AQA) and English Literature Paper 2 (AQA). Students begin the autumn term exploring the GCSE ‘Love and Relationship Poetry Cluster’ through learning about the context of poets and poems, and through analysing the methods poets use to convey their messages and ideas. After learning about several poems, students begin to make connections between them through focused comparisons. Students engage with writing tasks in lessons to support their explorations, and continue to study the poems across the entirety of the autumn term. For the spring term, students return to exploring Victorian England and Dickens through studying the 19th century text ‘Great Expectations’. Students, through reading the text and focusing on specific extracts, analyse plot, characters, themes, symbols and authorial intention. Students continue to develop their reading skills through this unit of work. For spring 2, students shift their focus away from reading to writing, to revise some of the skills they learnt across year 7 and 8. Students complete the reading of ‘Great Expectations’ but focus on writing skills in lessons: both narrative writing and descriptive writing. Students work on incorporating methods they have studied into their work. For the summer term, students are introduced to a range of short stories to support their study in their GCSE years – as such, two stories from ‘AQA Telling Tales’ are included. Students explore the short stories in isolation, with a focus on analysing the short stories in light of comments and opinions, in order to develop students’ ability to evaluate. The year culminates in a KS3 English Language Paper 1 exam to review student skills across the year.

 

In year 10, students begin their GCSE course; this results in students studying towards English Language Paper 1 (AQA), English Language Paper 2 (AQA), English Literature Paper 1 (AQA) and English Literature Paper 2 (AQA). Students begin the autumn term exploring the GCSE ‘Power and Conflict Poetry Cluster’ through learning about the context of poets and poems, and through analysing the methods poets use to convey their messages and ideas. After learning about several poems, students begin to make connections between them through focused comparisons. This learning continues beyond autumn 1 into autumn 2. Simultaneously in English Language-specific lessons, students use the poems as a prompt to engage with descriptive writing. Students learn how to immerse readers up to GCSE standard. For the spring term, students are reintroduced to the context surrounding Shakespeare, Elizabethan/Jacobean England and drama for their study of ‘Macbeth’. Students then read and explore plot, characters, themes and symbols. Focus is on reading for meaning and analysis, and students are led through a thorough understanding of each theme and message. Students continue their exploration of ‘Macbeth’ into spring 2 ensuring that their study is complete. During this half-term, students also spend time focusing on the writing section of English Language Paper 2, and specifically, the demands of writing non-fiction texts. Students analyse non-fiction texts, before crafting their own. For the summer term, students study the ‘AQA Telling Tales’ short story anthology over the course of the summer term. Students spend time exploring the short stories individually for character, plot and themes, before comparing the short stories and making links. Students analyse their anthologies, simultaneously to producing work in books. During the Language lessons, students engage with the Reading Section of English Language Paper 1. The year culminates in a mock English Language Paper 1 and English Literature Paper 2 exam to review student skills across the year.

 

In year 11, students continue their GCSE course and study towards English Language Paper 1 (AQA), English Language Paper 2 (AQA), English Literature Paper 1 (AQA) and English Literature Paper 2 (AQA). In autumn term, students begin to explore the context of ‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ and read the text together. Students simultaneously explore plot, character, themes, symbols, motifs and authorial intention, and look at a number of models to support them in their progress. Students are assessed for reading during class time, and are assessed for writing during additional Language lessons, intervention sessions and homework. Students continue and complete their study of ‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ over the first two weeks of autumn 2. Afterwards, students revise all of their learning across year 10 and year 11 to prepare them for English Literature Paper 1, English Literature Paper 2, English Language Paper 1 and English Language Paper 2. This revision takes place for the remainder of the year.

 

 

 

Autumn Term

1

Autumn Term

2

Spring Term

1

Spring Term

2

Summer Term

1

Summer Term

2

 

Year 7

Core Lessons

 

‘A Christmas Carol’ – Literature/Reading

 

‘A Christmas Carol’ – Narrative Writing

 

‘Romeo & Juliet’ – Literature/Reading

 

‘Romeo & Juliet’ – Literature/Reading

 

‘Myths & Legends’ – Descriptive Writing

 

‘Myths & Legends’ – Literature/Reading

 

Year 7

Literacy Lesson

 

 

Literacy Focus: Word Classes

Reader: ‘Trash’/’The Hunger Games’/’Noughts & Crosses’/’Face’/’Skellig’/‘A Christmas Carol’

 

Literacy Focus: Competitions/Sentence Types

Reader: ‘Trash’/’The Hunger Games’/’Noughts & Crosses’/’Face’/’Skellig’/‘Of Mice and Men’

 

Literacy Focus: Punctuation & Tenses

Reader: ‘Trash’/’The Hunger Games’/’Noughts & Crosses’/’Face’/’Skellig’/‘Of Mice and Men’

 

Year 8

Core Lessons

 

‘War and Conflict’ Poetry – Literature/Reading

 

 

‘War and Conflict’ – Non-fiction Writing

 

‘A Midnight Summer’s Dream’ – Literature/Reading

 

‘A Midnight Summer’s Dream’ – Literature/Reading

 

‘Gothic Literature’ – Narrative Writing

 

‘Gothic Literature’ – Literature/Reading

Year 8

Reading and Oracy Lesson (Modern Text)

‘Modern History – The Holocaust’ – ‘Anne Frank’s Diary and Other Extracts’

‘Modern History – The Holocaust’ – ‘Anne Frank’s Diary and Other Extracts’

 

‘Modern Drama’ – ‘Blood Brothers’

 

‘Modern Drama’ – ‘Blood Brothers’

 

‘Modern Drama’ – ‘An Inspector Calls’

 

‘Modern Drama’ – ‘An Inspector Calls’

 

Year 9 Literature Lessons

‘Poetry from Other Cultures and Voices’ – Literature/Reading

‘Poetry from Other Cultures and Voices’ – Literature/Reading

 

‘Great Expectations’ – Literature/Reading

 

‘Great Expectations’ – Literature/Reading

‘Introduction to Short Stories’ – Literature/Reading

‘Introduction to Short Stories’ – Literature/Reading

 

Year 9 Language Lesson

 

Descriptive and Narrative Writing

 

Descriptive and Narrative Writing

 

Non-fiction Writing

 

Non-fiction Writing

 

Rhetoric – Spoken Language Endorsement

 

Rhetoric – Spoken Language Endorsement

 

Year 10 Literature Lessons

‘Power and Conflict’ Poetry – Literature/Reading

‘Power and Conflict’ Poetry – Literature/Reading

‘Macbeth’ – Literature/Reading

‘Macbeth’ – Literature/Reading

‘AQA Anthology: Telling Tales’ – Literature/Reading

AQA Anthology: Telling Tales’ – Literature/Reading

 

Year 10 Language Lesson

 

Descriptive and Narrative Writing

 

Descriptive and Narrative Writing

 

Non-fiction Writing

 

Non-fiction Writing

 

Explorations in Creative Reading

 

Explorations in Creative Reading

 

Year 11 Literature Lessons

‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ – Literature/Reading

‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ – Literature/Reading

‘Power and Conflict’/’Telling Tales’ – Literature Reading

 

Revision of all Texts

 

Revision of all Texts / Exams

 

N / A

 

Year 11 Language Lesson

Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives – Reading Section

Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives – Writing Section

 

Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing

 

Revision of both Language Papers

 

Revision of both Language Papers

 

Exams

 

 

 

 

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